Compression garment-induced leg changes increase hemodynamic responses in healthy individuals

Daniel C.W. Lee, Helen Ka Wai Law, Ajmol Ali, Sinead E. Sheridan, Stephen H.S. Wong, Shara Wee Yee Lee

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

This study evaluated the morphological changes of the lower limb and associated hemodynamic responses to different lower-body compression pressures (COMPs) in physically active, healthy individuals at rest. Each of the 32 participants underwent three trials with three different degrees of lower-body compression applied: Low (2.2±1.4 mmHg), Medium (12.9±3.9 mmHg), and High (28.8±8.3 mmHg). In each COMP, a cross-sectional area of leg muscles (CSA muscle), subcutaneous fat (CSA fat), superficial vessels (SupV), deep arteries (DA), and deep veins (DV) at the calf, knee, and thigh levels were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were measured using Doppler ultrasound (USCOM ®). With High COMP, calf CSA muscle and SupV were smaller (p<0.01), whereas DA and DV were larger (p<0.05). Calf CSA fat, however, was similar among all COMPs. There were no major changes in CSA muscle and CSA fat at knee and thigh levels. CO (3.2±0.9 L/min) and SV (51.9±16.4 mL) were higher (p<0.05) only with High COMP, but other hemodynamic variables showed no significant changes across different COMPs. The High COMP at the lower limb induces leg morphological changes and increases associated hemodynamic responses of physically active healthy individuals at rest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume41
Issue number1
Early online date2 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • blood vessels
  • cardiac output
  • heart rate
  • MRI
  • stroke volume
  • ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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