Cognitive decline, sensory impairment, and the use of audio-visual aids by long-term care facility residents

Rick Yiu Cho Kwan, Chi Wai Kwan, Patrick Pui Kin Kor, Iris Chi

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hearing and vision impairments and the use of audio-visual aids are associated with cognitive decline in community-dwelling older people, but effects in long-term care facilities (LFCF) are unclear. We hypothesize that visual and hearing impairment are associated with cognitive decline and these relationships are mediated by using visual and hearing aids. Methods: Secondary data analysis of a longitudinal study was conducted in the 7 government-subsidized LTCF operated by one of the largest non-governmental organizations in Hong Kong using data between 2005 and 2016. Eligible residents were ≥ 60 years of age without severe cognitive impairment at baseline who had stayed in the facilities for more than 3 years. All variables were measured by using the Minimum Data Set-Resident Assessment Instrument Version 2.0, Hong Kong version. The outcome was cognitive decline. Predictors were visual and hearing impairments. Mediators were the use of visual and hearing aids. General linear models were employed to test the hypotheses. Results: Results for 2,233 residents were analyzed, with a mean age of 82.1 ± 8.2 years and a mean follow-up period of 4.4 ± 0.8 years. Results showed that those who had visual impairment (p = 0.004) and hearing impairments (p = 0.022) had a higher risk of cognitive decline. Using hearing aids (coefficient = 0.0186, p < 0.05) positively mediates the effect of hearing impairment on cognitive decline. Using visual aids (coefficient = -0.0881, p < 0.05) negatively mediates the effects of visual impairment on cognitive decline. Conclusion: In LTCF, hearing and visual impairments are associated with a higher risk of cognitive decline. Hearing aids often-users were associated with a higher risk of cognitive decline. LTCF residents with visual impairment did not use visual aids. Use of visual aids demonstrated potential effects in slowing cognitive decline. A future study with a larger and more diverse sample with attention to quality of devices is proposed to confirm its effects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number216
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Cognitive decline
  • Hearing aid
  • Hearing impairment
  • Visual aids
  • Visual impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cognitive decline, sensory impairment, and the use of audio-visual aids by long-term care facility residents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this