Bystander reaction differences between cyberbullying victims and non-victims among Chinese adolescents: The roles of online and offline social capitals

Qiqi Chen, Qiao Xiao, Bofan Liu, Zujian Lu

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

The increasing use of social networks makes online interactions more accessible and increases the risks of cyberbullying. There is a lack of research comparing the role of online and offline social capitals in facilitating positive bystander behaviours in cyberbullying. This study aims to investigate the relationships among cyberbullying victimization experiences, social capitals and bystander behaviours among adolescents. A total of 1207 students in grades 7–9 from boarding schools in China were recruited for this study. Multiphase regressions are used to explore the associations of social capitals and bystander behaviours. Results showed that cyberbullying victims reported more frequent residential mobility and less frequent communication with parents compared with non-victims. Participants with more offline capitals and less online capital reported fewer experiences as cyberbullying victims. Participants' defending bystander reactions were related to more offline social capitals and higher academic achievement. The findings from this study may contribute to our understanding of bystander reactions to cyberbullying and its relationship with online and offline social capitals among boarding school adolescents. The discussion could also provide implications for proactive and individualized intervention to improve online and offline social capitals to cyberbullying bystander behaviours in schools and communities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-362
Number of pages9
JournalChild and Family Social Work
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2024

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • boarding school
  • bystander behaviours
  • cyberbullying
  • social capital
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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