Building healthy eating knowledge and behavior: An evaluation of nutrition education in a skill training course for construction apprentices

Louisa Ming Yan Chung, Joanne Wai Yee Chung, Albert P.C. Chan

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Prior research has found poor health among construction workers is related to poor nutrition and low fruit and vegetable consumption. Promoting nutrition knowledge can improve dietary behaviors, but nutrition education among construction workers is limited. We evaluated the effectiveness of nutrition education on fruit and vegetable consumption among construction apprentices. In this pilot evaluative study, 36 construction apprentices enrolled in skill training programs received two 1.5-hour nutrition classes. Twelve questions addressing healthy eating knowledge and behavior were administered at baseline, after intervention, and at three months follow-up. After intervention, daily fruit consumption improved from baseline (mean (s.d.) =1.42 (0.55)) to post intervention (mean (s.d.) =1.72 (0.70)) (p < 0.05) and to three months follow-up (mean(s.d.) =1.94 (0.83)) (p > 0.05). After intervention, daily vegetable consumption improved from baseline (mean (s.d.) =1.67 (0.59)) to post intervention (mean (s.d.) =1.97 (0.74)) (p < 0.05) and to three months follow-up (mean (s.d.) = 2.19 (0.82)) (p > 0.05). Younger construction apprentices showed better healthy eating knowledge at post intervention and three months follow-up (p > 0.05). Working in normal hours showed better healthy eating knowledge at post intervention but not at three months follow up (p > 0.05). Both age groups and working hours did not show significant differences on healthy eating behaviour. Nutrition education implemented as a three-hour session within skill courses may possibly promote fruit and vegetable consumption among construction apprentices. Further research with control group is required to support the findings in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4852
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Construction apprentices
  • Fruit and vegetable consumption
  • Nutrition education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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