Bringing in communicative rationality into design participation: A lesson from Inclusive Design

Kwok Leung, Kwok Leung Denny Ho, Jin Ma, Peter C.K. Chuah, Yanki Lee

Research output: Chapter in book / Conference proceedingConference article published in proceeding or bookAcademic researchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article is an attempt to examine the extent to which Bourdieu's concepts of field, communicative rationality and rational deliberation is useful in designing game-like activities in design participation. We attempt to advocate the idea that changing the nature of the game is crucial in our understanding of the nature of design participation. In order to do this, we should design activities which could firstly reveal the nature and rules of the design games, and sensitize participants and designers to be aware of the constraining factors that would undermine the possibility of achieving 'the interest in disinterest' - a sentiment that would reduce the harmful effects of systematic distortion which comes from our socialization, social positions and collective learning. We also suggest that the study of body techniques to explore new domains of experience through which social inclusion is more likely to be realized. The study of the experience of two Inclusive Design workshops supports this suggestion.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPDC 2010 - Participation
Subtitle of host publicationThe Challenge, Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Participatory Design 2010
Pages101-110
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2010
Event11th Biennial Participatory Design Conference, PDC 2010 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 29 Nov 20103 Dec 2010

Conference

Conference11th Biennial Participatory Design Conference, PDC 2010
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period29/11/103/12/10

Keywords

  • Body techniques
  • Communicative rationality
  • Design for change
  • Field
  • Inclusive Design
  • Rational deliberation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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