Bicultural identity, bilingualism, and psychological adjustment in multicultural societies: Immigration-based and globalization-based acculturation

Xiaohua Sylvia Chen, Verónica Benet-Martínez, Michael Harris Bond

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

264 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present investigation examined the impact of bicultural identity, bilingualism, and social context on the psychological adjustment of multicultural individuals. Our studies targeted three distinct types of biculturals: Mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong, Filipino domestic workers (i.e., sojourners) in Hong Kong, and Hong Kong and Mainland Chinese college students. Individual differences in Bicultural Identity Integration (BII.; Benet-Martínez, Leu, Lee, & Morris, 2002) positively predicted psychological adjustment for all the samples except sojourners even after controlling for the personality traits of neuroticism and self-efficacy. Cultural identification and language abilities also predicted adjustment, although these associations varied across the samples in meaningful ways. We concluded that, in the process of managing multiple cultural environments and group loyalties, bilingual competence, and perceiving one's two cultural identities as integrated are important antecedents of beneficial psychological outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)803-837
Number of pages35
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume76
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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