Bibliometric study of research productivity in occupational therapy and physical therapy/physiotherapy around the world

Wai Kwong Man, Sui Fung Walter Tsang, Yiqing Lu, Wing Hong Hector Tsang (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: High-quality research is the foundation of occupational therapy and physical therapy/physiotherapy. A bibliometric study on the research productivity of occupational therapy and physical therapy/physiotherapy scholars in different Western and Asian countries/regions could provide a snapshot of current research achievement in rehabilitation science.

Method: On the basis of an understanding of the leading role of rehabilitation research in Western countries and a recognition of achievements made by Asian occupational therapy and physical therapy/physiotherapy scholars, the current bibliometric study examined the research productivity of occupational therapy and physical therapy/physiotherapy professors and associate professors from four Western countries (Australia, Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom) and five Asian countries/regions (Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan, Singapore and South Korea). The h-indices of these scholars were retrieved online and aggregated to quantify the research productivity of institutions and countries/regions.

Results: Australia, Canada, Hong Kong and the United States were identified as countries/regions with higher research productivity in occupational therapy and physical therapy/physiotherapy. The institutions were ranked on the basis of the median h-indices of their professors and associate professors; the top 20 productive institutions with occupational therapy programmes had a median h-index of 17.5 or higher, whereas the benchmark of the top 20 institutions with physical therapy/physiotherapy programmes was 25.

Conclusion: Professors and associate professors in Australia, Canada, Hong Kong and the United States are productive in occupational therapy and physical therapy/physiotherapy research. The number of faculty members and university connections are regarded as important for research achievement. Recommendations for various levels of collaboration are provided.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)690-699
Number of pages10
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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