Auricular diagnosis in chronic illnesses

Kwai Ping Lorna Suen, Chao Hsing Yeh

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Auricular diagnosis has been used as a complementary approach that is simple, effective, and inexpensive for identifying chronic illnesses. This diagnostic method has prediagnostic value and is important for a secondary level of prevention, so that earlier treatment can be provided. Objective: This article describes how this diagnostic method was applied in cases with coronary heart disease (CHD) or lower urinary-tract symptoms (LUTS), which are common chronic illnesses among the adult population. Materials and Methods: Design: A case-control study approach was adopted, with the utilization of visual inspection, electrical skin-resistance measurement, and tenderness testing to investigate the auricular signals and their relationship with specific chronic illnesses. The practitioners who conducted the auricular diagnosis were blinded to the known medical conditions of the subjects. Setting and Subjects: Subjects from the CHD +ve (positive) group (n=50) were recruited from the cardiac unit of a regional hospital in Hong Kong; whereas the subjects in the CHD -ve (negative; controls) group (n=50) and participants in the LUTS study (LUTS +ve and LUTS -ve; n=113) were recruited from the local community. Subjects with known health conditions were matched in age and gender with control subjects. Results: In the CHD study, the presence of an ear lobe crease was significantly associated with CHD. The Heart zone of the CHD +ve cases had significantly higher conductivity and had significant tenderness in both ears, compared with the control group. Similarly, nearly all of the specific acupoints in the participants in the LUTS +ve group indicated significantly higher conductivity and a tenderness sensation in the auricular areas associated with the kidneys and urinary tract than those in the LUTS -ve group. The predictive value of auricular signals for CHD/LUTS - which were detected by visual inspection, electrical skin-resistance measurement, and tenderness testing - was observed in a Chinese population. Conclusions: A systematic and scientific approach for the diagnostic accuracy of auricular signals involves using visual inspection, electrical skin-resistance measurement, and tenderness testing to investigate these signals and their relationship with specific chronic illnesses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-129
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Acupuncture
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Auricular diagnosis
  • Chronic illness
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Lower prinary tract symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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