Associations of symptoms of anxiety and depression with health-status, asthma control, dyspnoea, dysfunction breathing and obesity in people with severe asthma

Michelle A. Stubbs, Vanessa L. Clark, Peter G. Gibson, Janelle Yorke, Vanessa M. McDonald

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Anxiety and depression are comorbidities of severe asthma. However, clinical characteristics associated with coexisting severe asthma and anxiety/depression are poorly understood. The study objective is to determine clinical characteristics associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms in severe asthma. Methods: Severe asthma participants (N = 140) underwent a multidimensional assessment. Categorization of symptoms of anxiety and depression were based on HADS scale sub-scores and divided into four groups (< 8 on both subscales; ≥ 8 on one subscale; ≥ 8 on both subscales). Clinical characteristics were compared between subgroups. Multivariate logistic regression determined associations of clinical characteristics and anxiety and/or depressive symptoms in people with severe asthma. Results: Participants were (mean ± SD) 59.3 ± 14.7 years old, and 62% female. There were 74 (53%) severe asthma participants without symptoms of anxiety/depression, 11 (7%) with symptoms of anxiety, 37 (26%) with symptoms of depression and 18 (13%) with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Quality of life impairment was greater in participants with symptoms of depression (4.4 ± 1.2) and combined symptoms of anxiety and depression (4.4 ± 1.1). Asthma control was worse in those with symptoms of depression (2.9 ± 1.1) and combined anxiety and depression (2.6 ± 1.0). In multivariate models, dysfunctional breathing was associated with symptoms of anxiety (OR = 1.24 [1.01, 1.53]). Dyspnoea was associated with symptoms of depression (OR = 1.90 [1.10, 3.25]). Dysfunctional breathing (OR 1.16 [1.04, 1.23]) and obesity (OR 1.17 [1.00, 1.35]) were associated with combined symptoms of anxiety and depression. Conclusion: People with severe asthma and anxiety and/or depressive symptoms have poorer QoL and asthma control. Dyspnoea, dysfunctional breathing and obesity are associated with these symptoms. These key clinical characteristics should be targeted in severe asthma management.

Original languageEnglish
Article number341
JournalRespiratory Research
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Asthma control
  • Depression
  • Dysfunctional breathing
  • Dyspnoea
  • Obesity
  • Quality of life
  • Severe asthma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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