Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, air temperature, and humidity with perceived air quality and sick building syndrome symptoms in Chinese homes

Jing Hou, Yuexia Sun, Xilei Dai, Junjie Liu, Xiong Shen, Hongwei Tan, Haiguo Yin, Kailiang Huang, Yao Gao, Dayi Lai, Weiping Hong, Xinping Zhai, Dan Norbäck, Qingyan Chen

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The indoor environment influences occupants’ health. From March 1, 2018, to February 28, 2019, we continuously monitored indoor temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentration in bedrooms via an online system in 165 residences that covered all five climate zones of China. Meanwhile, we asked one specific occupant in each home to complete questionnaires about perceived air quality and sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms at the end of each month. Higher CO2 concentration was significantly associated with a higher percentage of perceived stuffy odor and skin SBS symptoms. Higher relative humidity was associated with higher percentage of perceived moldy odor and humid air, while lower RH was associated with a higher percentage of perceived dry air. Occupants who lived in residences with high RH were less likely to have mucosal and skin SBS symptoms (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.73–0.78). However, the benefit of high humidity for perceived dry air and skin dryness symptoms is weaker if there is a high CO2 concentration level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1018-1028
Number of pages11
JournalIndoor Air
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • CO
  • home
  • odors
  • perceived dry air
  • relative humidity
  • sick building syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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