An "independent visual background" reduced balance disturbance evoked by visual scene motion: Implication for alleviating simulator sickness

H. B.L. Duh, D. E. Parker, T. A. Furness

Research output: Unpublished conference presentation (presented paper, abstract, poster)Conference presentation (not published in journal/proceeding/book)Academic researchpeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Simulator sickness (SS) / virtual environment (VE) sickness is expected to become increasingly troublesome as VE technology evolves [20]. Procedures to alleviate SS / VE sickness have been of limited value [12]. This paper investigated a possible procedure to reduce SS and VE sickness. Postural disturbance was evoked by visual scene motion at different frequencies. Differences in disturbance were examined as a function of simultaneous exposure to an "independent visual background" (IVB). Eight subjects were tested at two scene motion frequencies and three different IVB conditions using a within-subjects design. An expected statistically significant interaction between IVB condition and frequency was observed. For low frequency scene movements, subjects exhibited less balance disturbance when the IVB was presented. We suggest that an IVB may alleviate disturbance when conflicting visual and inertial cues are likely to result in simulator or VE sickness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages85-89
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes
EventConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems CHI 2001 Anyone. Anywhere - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: 31 Mar 20015 Apr 2001

Conference

ConferenceConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems CHI 2001 Anyone. Anywhere
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period31/03/015/04/01

Keywords

  • Cybersickness
  • Self-motion perception
  • Simulator sickness
  • Virtual environments
  • Virtual reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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