An AIE-active bacterial inhibitor and photosensitizer for selective imaging, killing, and photodynamic inactivation of bacteria over mammalian cells

Fei Wang, Yupeng Shi, Po Yu Ho, Engui Zhao (Corresponding Author), Chuen Kam, Qiang Zhang, Xin Zhao, Yue Pan, Sijie Chen (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Photodynamic therapy is becoming increasingly popular for combat of bacteria. In the clinical photodynamic combat of bacteria, one critical issue is to avoid the potential damage to the host since the reactive oxygen species produced by photosensitizers are also harmful to mammalian cells. In this work, we report an aggregation-induced-emission-active bacterial inhibitor and photosensitizer, OEO-TPE-MEM (OTM), for the imaging, killing, and light-enhanced inactivation of bacteria. OTM could efficiently bind to and kill Gram-positive bacteria, while its affinity to Gram-negative bacteria is lower, and a higher OTM concentration is required for killing Gram-negative bacteria. OTM is also an efficient photosensitizer and could efficiently sensitize the production of reactive oxygen species, which enhances its killing effect on both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. More interestingly, OTM is very biocompatible with normal mammalian cells both in the dark and under light irradiation. OTM in mice models with bacteria-infected wounds could promote the healing of infected wounds without affecting their organs and blood parameters, which makes it an excellent candidate for clinical applications.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBioengineering and Translational Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 May 2023

Keywords

  • aggregation-induced emission
  • bacterial inhibitor
  • photodynamic therapy
  • photosensitizer
  • wound healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmaceutical Science

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