Acute Effects of Tai Chi Training on Cognitive and Cardiovascular Responses in Late Middle-Aged Adults: A Pilot Study

Tiffany C.Y. Cheung, Karen P.Y. Liu, Janet Y.H. Wong, Young Hyeon Bae, Stanley Sai Chuen Hui, Wai Nam Tsang, Yoyo T.Y. Cheng, Shirley S.M. Fong

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored the immediate effects of Tai Chi (TC) training on attention and meditation, perceived stress level, heart rate, oxygen saturation level in blood, and palmar skin temperature in late middle-aged adults. Twenty TC practitioners and 20 nonpractitioners volunteered to join the study. After baseline measurements were taken, the TC group performed TC for 10 minutes while their cognitive states and cardiovascular responses were concurrently monitored. The control group rested for the same duration in a standing position. Both groups were then reassessed. The participants' attention and meditation levels were measured using electroencephalography; stress levels were measured using Perceived Stress Scale; heart rate and blood oxygenation were measured using an oximeter; and palmar skin temperature was measured using an infrared thermometer. Attention level tended to increase during TC and dropped immediately thereafter (p<0.001). Perceived stress level decreased from baseline to posttest in exclusively the TC group (p=0.005). Heart rate increased during TC (p<0.001) and decreased thereafter (p=0.001). No significant group, time, or group-by-time interaction effects were found in the meditation level, palmar skin temperature, and blood oxygenation outcomes. While a 10-minute TC training could temporarily improve attention and decrease perceived stress levels, it could not improve meditation, palmar skin temperature, or blood oxygenation among late middle-aged adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7575123
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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