Action Seniors! Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Secondary Falls Prevention Strategy Among Community-Dwelling Older Fallers

Jennifer C. Davis, Karim M. Khan, Chun Liang Hsu, Patrick Chan, Wendy L. Cook, Larry Dian, Teresa Liu-Ambrose

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Otago Exercise Program (OEP) has demonstrated cost-effectiveness for the primary prevention of falls in a general community setting. The cost-effectiveness of exercise as a secondary falls prevention (ie, preventing falls among those who have already fallen) strategy remains unknown. The primary objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness (incremental cost-effectiveness/utility ratio) of the OEP from a healthcare system perspective. DESIGN: A concurrent 12-month prospective economic evaluation conducted alongside the Action Seniors! randomized critical trial (OEP compared with usual care). SETTING: Vancouver Falls Prevention Clinic (Vancouver, BC, Canada; http://www.fallsclinic.ca). PARTICIPANTS: A total of 344 community-dwelling older adults, aged 70 years and older, who attended a geriatrician-led Falls Prevention Clinic in Vancouver, after sustaining a fall in the previous 12 months. MEASUREMENTS: Main outcome measures included: incidence rate ratio for falls, healthcare costs, incremental cost per fall prevented, and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. RESULTS: The OEP costs $393 CAD per participant to implement. The incremental cost per fall prevented resulted in a savings of $2 CAD. The incremental cost per QALY gained (where QALYs were estimated using the Euro-Qol 5D three-level version [EQ-5D-3L]) indicated the OEP was less effective than usual care. The incremental cost per QALY gained (where QALYs were estimated using the Short Form 6D [SF-6D]) indicated the OEP was more effective and less costly than usual care. The incremental QALYs estimated using the EQ-5D-3L and the SF-6D were not clinically significant and close to zero, indicating no change in quality of life. CONCLUSION: Compared with usual care, healthcare system costs are saved and falls are prevented when older fallers who attend a geriatrician-led falls clinic are allocated to, and provided, the physiotherapist-guided exercise-based falls prevention program (the OEP).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1988-1997
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume68
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cost-effectiveness
  • cost-utility
  • economic evaluation
  • falls
  • older adults
  • Otago Exercise Program

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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