Acquired pasts and the commodification of borrowed heritage: the case of the Bank of America Stadium tour

Gregory Ramshaw, Sean Gammon, Wei-Jue Huang

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Contemporary understandings of heritage and heritage tourism have viewed 'heritage' as more than just tangible objects and places but also the social values and practices associated with things and places of heritage. As such, sports heritage venues often emphasize the history of the sport or the team to sustain the legacy of the place and create a meaningful experience for the visitors. However, stadiums that are relatively new lack the 'recognizable' heritage that could be incorporated into their stadium tour narratives. To understand different forms of heritage construction, this study examines tours of the Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina, home of the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). Being a stadium with little history, its tour narratives are not rooted in the heritage of the venue itself but rather in the more intangible traditions, language, and rituals of NFL fandom. In particular, the stadium tour espouses the identity, experience and performance of being an NFL fan, providing patrons an opportunity to not only reflect on their past spectator experiences, but also to create new personal/collective heritage through continued consumption. In addition, the tour borrows heritage from other NFL-based heritage markers in order to reinforce the authenticity of the location and experience, seemingly until such time that the facility and team can establish a recognizable and commodifiable 'home-grown' heritage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-31
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Sport and Tourism
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2013

Keywords

  • guided tours
  • heritage tourism
  • performance
  • sports tourism
  • tourist experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

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