A pilot study on the effectiveness of tele-analogy-based problem-solving training for people with brain injuries

Wallace Soong, Sing Fai Tam, Wai Kwong Man, Christina Hui-Chan

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People with brain injuries must often deal with cognitive problems, including social problem solving. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a 20-session, online, interactive, skill-training programme on the solving of problems using analogies. It was hypothesized that the programme could help people with brain injuries learn better problem-solving skills through systematic, theoretically driven learning strategies. Fifteen Hong Kong-Chinese with brain injuries participated in this pilot study. They were randomly assigned to an online programme, a computer-assisted programme or a therapist-administered programme. The three programmes had a similar structure and contents, including basic components problem solving, reflective sessions and functional problem solving. Outcome measures included the Category Test of Halstead-Reitan Test Battery, and a daily problem-solving performance and self-efficacy checklist. The results showed that the subjects of the three programmes generally demonstrated higher post-training self-efficacy and basic problem-solving skills. The group using the online programme, however, showed better and quicker improvements in problem-solving performance, and demonstrated a general trend towards making fewer errors in complex problem-solving tasks. In conclusion, people with brain injuries can use the successful problem-solving experiences obtained in the training programmes with different delivery modes to solve daily living problems that are similar in nature. However, the generalizability of the effects of the programme is still to be determined.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-347
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Brain injury
  • Problem solving
  • Rehabilitation
  • Tele-rehabilitation
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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