A particle image velocimetry study on the pulsatile flow characteristics in straight tubes with an asymmetric bulge

Ching Man Yu, J.B. Zhao

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Flow characteristics in straight tubes with an asymmetric bulge have been investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV) over a range of Reynolds numbers from 600 to 1200 and at a Womersley number of 22. A mixture of glycerine and water (approximately 40:60 by volume) was used as the working fluid. The study was carried out because of their relevance in some aspects of physiological flows, such as arterial flow through a sidewall aneurysm. Results for both steady and pulsatile flow conditions were obtained. It was found that at a steady flow condition, a weak recirculating vortex formed inside the bulge. The recirculation became stronger at higher Reynolds numbers but weaker at larger bulge sizes. The centre of the vortex was located close to the distal neck. At pulsatile flow conditions, the vortex appeared and disappeared at different phases of the cycle, and the sequence was only punctuated by strong forward flow behaviour (near the peak flow condition). In particular, strong flow interactions between the parent tube and the bulge were observed during the deceleration phase. Stents and springs were used to dampen the flow movement inside the bulge. It was found that the recirculation vortex could be eliminated completely in steady flow conditions using both devices. However, under pulsatile flow conditions, flow velocities inside the bulge could not be suppressed completely by both devices, but could be reduced by more than 80 per cent. Flow characteristics in straight tubes with an asymmetric bulge have been investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV) over a range of Reynolds numbers from 600 to 1200 and at a Womersley number of 22. A mixture of glycerine and water (approximately 40:60 by volume) was used as the working fluid. The study was carried out because of their relevance in some aspects of physiological flows, such as arterial flow through a sidewall aneurysm. Results for both steady and pulsatile flow conditions were obtained. It was found that at a steady flow condition, a weak recirculating vortex formed inside the bulge. The recirculation became stronger at higher Reynolds numbers but weaker at larger bulge sizes. The centre of the vortex was located close to the distal neck. At pulsatile flow conditions, the vortex appeared and disappeared at different phases of the cycle, and the sequence was only punctuated by strong forward flow behaviour (near the peak flow condition). In particular, strong flow interactions between the parent tube and the bulge were observed during the deceleration phase. Stents and springs were used to dampen the flow movement inside the bulge. It was found that the recirculation vortex could be eliminated completely in steady flow conditions using both devices. However, under pulsatile flow conditions, flow velocities inside the bulge could not be suppressed completely by both devices, but could be reduced by more than 80 per cent.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-671
Number of pages17
JournalProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part C: Journal of Mechanical Engineering
Volume214
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biofluids
  • Particle image
  • Pulsatile flow
  • Velocimetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

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