A generalised phase field model for fatigue crack growth in elastic–plastic solids with an efficient monolithic solver

Zeyad Khalil, Ahmed Y. Elghazouli, Emilio Martínez-Pañeda

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a generalised phase field-based formulation for predicting fatigue crack growth in metals. The theoretical framework aims at covering a wide range of material behaviour. Different fatigue degradation functions are considered and their influence is benchmarked against experiments. The phase field constitutive theory accommodates the so-called AT1, AT2 and phase field-cohesive zone (PF-CZM) models. In regards to material deformation, both non-linear kinematic and isotropic hardening are considered, as well as the combination of the two. Moreover, a monolithic solution scheme based on quasi-Newton algorithms is presented and shown to significantly outperform staggered approaches. The potential of the computational framework is demonstrated by investigating several 2D and 3D boundary value problems of particular interest. Constitutive and numerical choices are compared and insight is gained into their differences and similarities. The framework enables predicting fatigue crack growth in arbitrary geometries and for materials exhibiting complex (cyclic) deformation and damage responses. The finite element code developed is made freely available at www.empaneda.com/codes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number114286
JournalComputer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering
Volume388
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Bauschinger effect
  • Fatigue
  • Kinematic hardening
  • Phase field fracture
  • Quasi-Newton

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • General Physics and Astronomy
  • Computer Science Applications

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